Speaking History
Session Information

Dr. Injong Rhee

CTO & EVP of Software & Services, Mobile Communications Business
Samsung Electronics
Speaking History
Session Information

Dr. Injong Rhee is CTO and EVP of Software and Services, Mobile Communications at Samsung Electronics. Having joined Samsung in 2011, Rhee’s vision was to increase the core competency of Samsung’s software and services. This was soon realized through the launch of award-winning technologies, Samsung KNOX and Samsung Pay in 2013 and 2015 respectively.

Recognizing the growing importance of data security and privacy, Rhee led the development of KNOX, a proprietary security platform built into more than 200 million Samsung devices around the world. The product has received an extensive list of government security certifications, including accreditations from the USA, UK, France, Australia, and China. KNOX has also been named the most secure enterprise solution for mobile devices by Gartner.

Under Rhee’s leadership, Samsung Pay was launched in 2015, a product underpinned with three key principals; simplicity, security and accessibility.  Samsung Pay is the only mobile payments provider to use Magnetic Secure Transmission (MST). MST is an advanced and innovative solution widely accepted around the world to enable customers to use Samsung Pay virtually anywhere. Within six months of Samsung Pay’s launch in Korea and the USA, the service garnered more than five million users and facilitated half a billion dollars of transactions. Rhee has recently led the expansion of Samsung Pay into Singapore and Spain, with plans to launch the service into a number of additional markets, including Australia and Brazil in 2016.

Before joining Samsung, Rhee was a tenured professor of Computer Science at North Carolina State University. He is a celebrated inventor of the BIC and CUBIC TCP congestion control algorithms, which is now the default TCP congestion control used in all Linux and Android devices around the world.

Rhee is also a recipient of the NSF Career Award and won the IEEE Communications Society William R. Bennett Prize in 2013 and 2016 for his work in human mobility modeling and wifi offloading respectively.